Is the United States “a nation of immigrants,” a “land of opportunity,” a refuge for the world’s persecuted and poor? Is the country made stronger by its ability to welcome and absorb people from around the world? Or are the new arrivals a burden? Should the United States close its borders to immigrants because of their numbers, their countries of origin, their politics, religions, financial means, educational levels, or medical conditions—all of which have been factors in one or more immigration laws over the past 150 years? What does it mean to be an immigrant, to be born in one country and spend much of one’s life in another? What consequences does immigration have for the individuals, families, and communities who migrate? Debates over immigration often turn on understandings of cultural difference and on changing expectations of how foreign-born people should adapt to and participate in American society. These questions and more are posed in The Newberry’s Immigration and Citizenship in the United States, 1865–1924, a freely accessible digital collection that pairs primary sources with discussion questions for the classroom.

Kim Estes
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Kim Estes

Lead Learning Technologies Coach at Burleson ISD
Teacher, Techie, Mom of 6, Autism Advocate, Army Brat, Navy Wife, Starbucks Addict, Pinterest Fanatic, Google Certified Trainer
Kim Estes
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Primary Source Collection on Immigration
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